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Lochner Law Firm, P.C.


Todd D. Lochner
Melaina D. Haisfield*
Chris J. McNally**
Eugene E. Samarin
Gregory R. Singer

Lochner Law Firm, P.C.
Donner Building
91 Main St., 4th Floor
Annapolis, MD 21401

P: (443) 716-4400
F: (443) 716-4405

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* Barred in MD, FL, TX & DC
** Barred in RI & MA

HOW TO PAY YOUR EMPLOYEES AND RENT WITH GOVERNMENT GRANTS AND LOANS


Updated April 7, 2020

Every maritime business which is affected by the COVID-19 virus should be immediately focused on applying for state and federal funds to keep their business running, before the funds run out, as they are “first come first served.” The CARES act, together with the existing Small Business Administration (SBA) disaster loan programs and new state relief programs, are intended to put money into your business to keep it running. As you have probably heard, this basically entails the government giving you a combination of grants, loans, and potentially partially forg iven money to pay your employees, rent, and utilities, along with low-interest loans to cover other expenses. We are here to help you navigate the complicated process and the different types of relief, so that you can keep paying your employees and keep your business afloat. Call us today and we can assist with your applications to help get your business the funds in needs to keep running.

Our attorneys are licensed in Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Texas, Rhode Island and District of Columbia, so this site will focus on those states. However, we will pass along any information that is made avaible by our collegues from accross the country.

By State

Florida Maryland



- - - - Florida - - - -


Here are the primary types of relief available which we can help you apply for today, and which can get you funding very quickly. While the promises of near-instant funding are being slowed down by the thousands of recent applications, the hope is that the earlier you file for this relief, the sooner you will receive funding. We can help you be ready and/or apply for the following:

  • Payroll Protection Loans. These provide you low-interest SBA loans immediately to retain your workforce and pay your rent and utilities to keep your business stable. The point is that the government is giving you money to retain your workforce and pay you overhead during this crisis. Provided you keep paying 90% of your workforce through June 30th and meet other requirements, you will not have to pay back the amount you borrowed for payroll, rent, and utilities. Again, to the extent that a portion is forgiven under the CARES act, this is essentially free money from the government to retain your employees and facilities.

  • SBA Emergency Injury Disaster Loans. These SBA Disaster loans provide you with low-interest loans up to $2 million, with repayment terms determined by your ability to repay the loan.

  • Emergency Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Grant. Under the CARES Act, emergency EIDLs are available for businesses or cooperatives with fewer than 500 employees, sole proprietors or independent contractors, or Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs) with fewer than 500 employees. Additionally, the CARES Act waives requirements that (1) the borrower provide a personal guarantee for loans up to $200,000, (2) that the eligible business be in operation for one year prior to the disaster, and (3) that the borrower be unable to obtain credit elsewhere. The SBA is also empowered to approve applicants for small-dollar loans solely on the basis of their credit score or "alternative appropriate methods to determine an applicant's ability to repay."

  • Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loans. This program provides short-term, interest-free and fee-free loans to businesses impacted by COVID-19. The program is designed to help small businesses bridge the gap between the time of disaster and when a small business can secure long-term and permanent financial assistance, such as a U.S. SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan or proceeds from the Paycheck Protection Program. Qualified businesses may receive up to $50,000 in loaned funds ($100,000 may be made in special cases based on the need of the eligible business). Loans carry 0% interest for the first 12 months, and the interest rate will be 12% per annum on the unpaid balance thereafter, until the loan balance is repaid in full. Loan default is subject to normal commercial collection process.

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- - - - Maryland - - - -


Here are the primary types of relief available which we can help you apply for today in Maryland, and for which can get you funding very quickly. While the promises of near-instant funding from Gov. Hogan are being slowed down by the thousands of recent applications, at present we are seeing an approximately 1-week turnaround for funding. For the SBA loans, processes and procedures are being developed this week by SBA and Banks. We can help you be ready and/or apply for the following:

  • Payroll Protection Loans. These provide you low-interest SBA loans immediately to retain your workforce and pay your rent and utilities to keep your business stable. The point is that the government is giving you money to retain your workforce and pay you overhead during this crisis. Provided you keep paying 90% of your workforce through June 30th and meet other requirements, you will not have to pay back the amount you borrowed for payroll, rent, and utilities. Again, to the extent that a portion is forgiven under the CARES act, this is essentially free money from the government to retain your employees and facilities.

    AT THIS TIME WELLS FARGO BANK IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THIS PROGRAM.

  • SBA Emergency Injury Disaster Loans. These SBA Disaster loans provide you with low-interest loans up to $2 million, with repayment terms determined by your ability to repay the loan.

  • Emergency Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Grant. Under the CARES Act, emergency EIDLs are available for businesses or cooperatives with fewer than 500 employees, sole proprietors or independent contractors, or Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs) with fewer than 500 employees. Additionally, the CARES Act waives requirements that (1) the borrower provide a personal guarantee for loans up to $200,000, (2) that the eligible business be in operation for one year prior to the disaster, and (3) that the borrower be unable to obtain credit elsewhere. The SBA is also empowered to approve applicants for small-dollar loans solely on the basis of their credit score or "alternative appropriate methods to determine an applicant's ability to repay."

  • Maryland Small Business Relief Grant Fund. This fund provides up to $10,000 in grants – that’s free money you don’t need to pay back – if your business has undergone disruptions as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. AT THIS TIME MARYLAND IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THIS PROGRAM.

  • Maryland Small Business Emergency Loan Fund. This fund provides up to $50,000 in loans to business which have been disrupted by the COVID-19 crisis. Loans carry 0% interest for the first 12 months, and 2% interest for the remaining 36 months of the loan. Payments on the loan can be deferred for up to twelve months. AT THIS TIME MARYLAND IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THIS PROGRAM.

  • COVID-19 Layoff Aversion Fund. The Maryland Department of Labor is now accepting applications for the COVID-19 Layoff Aversion Fund, which can provide funds to help businesses with 500 or fewer employees purchasing remote access equipment and software to allow employees to work from home, provide on-site cleaning and sanitation services or other creative strategies to mitigate potential layoffs or closures. AT THIS TIME MARYLAND IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THIS PROGRAM.

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In our opinion, virtually every business should be applying for a combination of these programs. There is money on the table to keep your business running, and the government wants you to use it. Please call or email us today so we can help your business weather the COVID-19 storm.

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